Jaguar Lee’s Mortal Engines

Every now and again, when I start to think that everyone has forgotten Mortal Engines, the internet throws up something wonderful to prove that a few people are still reading it, and that it’s inspiring them to create fantastic artwork. That happened this week, when Dave De Gobbi got in touch on the Facebook page to tell me about this amazing series of pictures by design student Jaguar Lee.  

What I like about them is the way they re-imagine the book; completely ignoring a lot of the description  to create something which is completely individual, but which somehow captures the feeling I was after – huge machines in dusty landscapes, and people dwarfed by the scale of their technology.

I’ve reproduced a couple of samples here, with Jaguar Lee’s permission – be sure to have a look at his blog for more. He tells me that he’ll be updating it with further Mortal Engines images soon, and it’s also full of lots of other cool landscape, costume and creature designs.

There’s one (non Mortal Engines) image in particular which could almost be an illustration for a scene I just wrote in the story I’m working on at the moment – but I’m not going to tell you which one it is!

Diego’s Engineerium

When writing a book like Mortal Engines, set in made up places full of strange stuff, there are some things that you imagine in great detail – I know exactly what the inside of the airship Jenny Haniver looks like, for instance – and others that remain a bit of a blur. The building called the Engineerium is one such blurry place for me: it’s where London’s ruling caste of Engineers hang out, but I didn’t want to bog the story down in complex detail of its floorplan, so I while I was writing I saw it in a more dreamlike way; I know there are many different levels, and balconies, and a big open central space with a monorail spiralling up through it, but exactly how it all fits together I never needed to know.

So pity the poor production or set design student who has to visualise it all in 3D and can’t just say, ‘They turned down another corridor’ and rely on his audience to supply the details.  Diego Miguel Pérez de la Guardia was set the task of designing a building or structure for an imaginary Mortal Engines movie as part of a college project, and took his inspiration from the scenes in the book where Bevis and Katherine break into the Engineerium.  He says:

The claw shape of the building gave me a bit of a headache as I did not like any of the fancy shapes that I ended up designing. So, in the end I took a portion of Battersea power station in the actual London and built around it a massive steel and black glass structure supported on four legs similar to a bicycle suspension. This made the building look like a claw and also by the use of springs it would keep the whole building held to resist the movements of London.  Inside I made a different kind of structure formed by pillars and bridges. On some of these platforms I also placed small labs made from prefab units (as it is all about recycling…) Through all this I managed to design a monorail inspired by cable cars that you find at ski stations. It is a closed cycle formed by two spirals: the interior spiral that takes the cars up and then on the top level it opens up, making the exterior spiral to take the cars down. 

“I also designed all those cogs which are supposed to produce the energy to move the monorail and columns that have springs inside to once again support the movements. I wanted to have a double high laboratory where the engineers are sort of designing a new planet or world order. There are a couple of more things but basically I wanted to provide gateways, bridges, balconies, stairs and different spaces where the two kids could run and get confused between the engineers.
The results is this extraordinary model, which somehow looks all the more eerie and Engineerish for being deserted and uncoloured. Many thanks to Diego for these photographs. Sadly I don’t have one of the claw-like Battersea Power Station exterior, but I’d love to see it.  As with a lot of the Mortal Engines artwork which people send me, I wish I’d had these to refer to back when I was writing the book!